The magic of the SWIFT Codes

I had a busy day today. I spent almost half a day trying to sort out a payment which a China client claimed to have made but was returned by the remitting Chinese bank. The client claimed that they had following the payment instructions appearing on our invoice to the letter. So if there were an error it could only be that the banking information provided by us was incorrect. Without checking,  I knew the client’s claim did not have a leg to stand on.  Personally, I think any company which got the instructions for making payments on its invoice wrong should not be in business at all.  I knew our company would not be one of them. Further, our bank, Citibank, is an international bank. I did not doubt for a minute their ability in handling such transaction.

The ball was clearly on the client’s court. I wrote an e-mail to the client asking them to sort out the matter with their bank. Apparently the client was not happy that I was pointing the finger at them or their bank. The client reiterated that it had done everything right and was trying to pass the ball to me.

Finally, the client sent me the note that Citibank sent to the remitting bank. When I looked at the note, lo and behold, I knew where the problem was.  Citibank was advising the remitting bank to comply with the SWIFT practice for remittance of such sort. Nevertheless I could not pin down what exactly went wrong. Thanks to my colleague’s  advice, the remitting bank apparently ommitted to put down the relevant SWIFT code. No wonder the remittance was rejected.

SWIFT codes are like branch codes but are applicable to banks when making overseas money transfers. The relevant SWIFT codes could easily be obtained through searching the SWIFT portal. I did that on the Citibank New York office by entering the name of the bank at the said portal. I was surprised why the China remitting bank, which should be familiar with international banking practices, could have overlooked such an important piece of information.

More on China banks tomorrow.

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